Thursday, April 17, 2014

No Pity for Warren

 
Elizabeth Warren is hurt and angry over the media coverage of her false claim of Cherokee ancestry. That would be funny if it weren't so pitiful. All she had to do was investigate, tell the truth, and the issue would have gone away. She could have used her new book to acknowledge the truth and apologize for her blatant disrespect of minorities, but instead, she's continued to perpetuate the lie and attempted to portray herself as a victim.
“What really threw me, though, were the constant attacks from the other side,” she writes about the 2012 Senate campaign. “I would almost persuade myself that I was starting to get the hang of full-throttle campaigning and then — bam! Out of left field, the state Republican Party, or the Brown campaign, or some blogger, would launch a rocket at me.”
Doing the research, finding the facts and sharing the truth about someone is not an attack. If people were launching rockets, it is because Warren gave them a big target. Research was done to determine if she had Cherokee ancestry. She didn't have any. That is not an opinion. It is a sound conclusion based on a preponderance of evidence found in historical documents. No one had any control over the lies told except Elizabeth Warren. She had control over it when she opened her mouth and told the story. She also had control when she repeatedly defended her story, despite the overwhelming evidence to the contrary. If Elizabeth Warren was a victim, she was only a victim of her own arrogance and dishonesty. If she felt hurt and angry over what happened, she has no one to blame but herself. She could have, should have, just told the truth. She chose not to do that. I don't feel sorry for her.


Those are my thoughts for today.
Thanks for reading.





copyright 2014, Polly's Granddaughter - TCB

Monday, March 24, 2014

The End of the Trail - 175 Years Later


For those of you who have been watching the countdown ticker in the sidebar, you might have noticed it now says, "March 24." That indicates this is the day the final Trail of Tears detachments arrived in Indian Territory, 175 years ago.

After spending months in concentration camps (called stockades to make it sound better), with little shelter and food not fit for human consumption, they were divided up in detachments and sent west. They survived one of the coldest winters on record and at one point, according to the journal of Rev. Daniel S. Butrick, approximately 8000 were stranded by the ice on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. They were freezing and there was sickness and death everywhere. Despite this, as a nation, they endured and survived. They reached Indian Territory and rebuilt their nation in an untamed land and they thrived. While the Trail of Tears is a sad part of our history, it serves as an example of the strength of the Cherokees. They couldn't prevent the removal, but they could triumph over it. They did, so never forget.

Those are my thoughts for today.
Thanks for reading.





copyright 2014, Polly's Granddaughter - TCB

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Facebook Cherokee Groups Warning


WARNING! ~ It has come to my attention that there are some Cherokee groups on facebook that ask for private documentation, such as birth certificates, to prove parentage of living people before such groups will allow one to join. Please do not send anyone copies of your birth certificate, tribal citizenship cards or any other document that could be used by someone with ulterior motives. Identity theft is always a concern. Protect yourself. No facebook group is so important that you should feel pressured to share personal documents.



copyright 2014, Polly's Granddaughter - TCB